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Building brand trust with explainer videos

· Tricks of the trade · , ,

Education and entertainment join forces

There comes a time in every business when you need to educate your customers about something that’s important to you. It could be a new product or service, a project you’re involved in, a position you’re taking a stance on, or even your organisation in general. Presenting this information in an easily digestible yet engaging way is where most businesses start to struggle.

Finding a concise way to communicate your value (and your values) is a powerful business asset, which is the main reason that most companies spend months, or even years, refining their elevator pitch. So how can you effectively communicate this information to potential customers?

The first thing to understand is customers are time-poor – they’re looking for succinct information about who you are, what you do and why they should be shopping with you. While your first instinct might be to kit out your website with a series of lengthy paragraphs detailing the intricacies of your offering, the reality is you need to communicate fast to keep potential customers on your page with a good mix of written and visual content.

Successfully educating your consumers means capturing their attention and helping them to understand your proposition, while keeping them engaged so they don’t click away. This is where explainer videos come in.

An explainer video uses storytelling to convey your message clearly and concisely, with the use of stimulating animation to hold their attention. Their short format and animated imagery can help to illustrate core messages effectively, with a greater level of information retention compared to text alone.

Take the video we made for the Australian Driverless Vehicles Initiative (ADVI). To unpack the mystifying topic of driverless cars and how Australia can position itself as a key player in the field, we created a visual story of ADVI and its reason for being: the progression of autonomous vehicle technology at an international level and the developments needed on Australian soil to help us stay at the forefront of this global movement. All this in under two minutes.

After watching the video, viewers are aware of the pace of progression in the field, the benefits of the technology and the eventual goals of ADVI, ultimately inspiring them to place their trust in the organisation.

Simply put, if consumers don’t understand your offering, they’ll find it difficult to develop trust in your brand. Excelling by nailing your messaging and demonstrating best practise communication tactics like explainer videos will establish your place as an industry leader, strengthening your reputation and ideally building brand equity.

Whether you’re a veteran of the trade or just finding your legs, effective storytelling is essential to communicate your value proposition to consumers. A great explainer video will make the perfect pitch, every time.

5 things every NFP needs to think about...

· Tricks of the trade · , ,

This article by Caroline Catterall originally appeared on Pro Bono Australia.

According to JBWere’s Cause Report (2016), there are more than 56,894 NFP organisations in Australia. That’s one NFP for every 422 individuals with around 10 new charities being established every business day.  Each is vying for attention and in most cases, the disposable income of businesses and consumers.  So how do you cut through in a cluttered market? Here are five reasons NFP’s need to think about content marketing.

1. PR may not be your silver bullet

A lot of NFPs turn to PR as their first port-of-call for raising awareness and ‘getting their story out there,’ and for good reason.  PR is comparatively inexpensive when compared to other forms of marketing, and can be an incredibly effective way of building empathy and an emotional connection with your audience.  The truth is when PR works, it works well.  The impact a well-positioned, on-message piece of editorial can deliver is second to none.  But what happens when you run out of news, want to deliver a more commercial message, or want complete control over the timing and delivery of your message?

2. You’ve hit the point of diminishing returns

Some NFPs will reach a point in their communications lifecycle where they hit the point of diminishing returns with PR. The first headline published about the brand was powerful and exciting, it brought the NFP to the surface of consumers’ awareness and created substantial value for the organisation. As you continue to flex the PR muscle however, the results can start to become less substantial. This can happen for a number of reasons. While it’s sometimes possible to ‘refresh’ a PR program and come up with new angles the media is more interested in, an NFP’s objectives might not always line up with the media’s agenda and this can throw your message off-track.  That’s why we advocate a combined earned and owned strategy, that combines PR with brand publishing and content marketing, to allow NFP clients to be more in control of their communications.

NFPs need content marketing - source https://personalexcellence.co/blog/law-of-diminishing-returns/

3. Keep two-hands on the wheel

A well-balanced ratio to keep in mind is 40/60.  For an emerging NFP that needs to sustain its profile but must also think and act commercially, we recommend 40% of the total budget be dedicated to earned media, and the remaining 60% to content creation and marketing.  Owned content can be used, reused, dressed up, broken into bite size pieces and circulated year-round. Through our work with Red Nose (formerly SIDS & Kids), we developed a suite of owned content assets that turned into an award-winning campaign. The content was pushed out via a public relations campaign, hosted on their website, used in eDMs, leveraged extensively across their social channels and broadcast for a number of months as a community service announcement.

4. It is a ‘must-have’ in your budget

Content is no longer a nice addition if you happen to have extra budget, it’s a highly consumed information source. Russell Sparkman of FusionSpark Media says that “non-profits have to make budgeting for content a priority when creating their budgets; the reality of the world we live in today is that content for advancing non-profit goals is as essential as oxygen is to breathing. It can’t be an afterthought or a task relegated to the when-we-can-afford-it shelf.”  According to Forbes, global Internet traffic from videos will make up 80% of all Internet traffic by 2019 and four times as many consumers would prefer to watch a video about a product or offering than read about it.

5. Be your own biggest advocate

But of course, there’s no point serving up your own content if it’s not going to hit the intended audience or get a reach that justifies the cost of producing it.  That’s why brands need to become their own publishers and start to look at their digital assets – namely their core website and any microsites – as vehicles to drive traffic, and social media platforms as the way to rally and recruit an audience, alongside SEO and search marketing.  Your social channels have the potential to reach prospective donors and advocate in the same way a media headline does.  Even better, combine the two with SEO and you might just find that silver bullet you were looking for.

Find out more about our work with not-for-profits across Australia, including St John AmbulanceRed Nose and Wesley Mission Victoria, or get in contact to see how we could work with your brand.

Recruiting for Guide Dogs Australia

· Campaigns · , , ,

Going national to recruit for Guide Dogs Australia

Who wouldn’t jump at the chance to cuddle an adorable Guide Dog puppy? What if you were given the option to keep one for a little while? Our social change PR team recently rolled out a recruitment campaign for Guide Dogs Victoria to spread the word about the growing need for puppy raisers across Australia, securing an interview with ABC News Breakfast to help recruit for the envious role.

With two small puppies trailing behind her, Charlie Spendlove of Guide Dogs Victoria joined Ali and PK on the ABC News Breakfast couch to chat about what is involved in being a puppy raiser.

The interview was broadcast nationally across ABC and ABC News 24 a total of five times, with a potential audience of 1,237,000 viewers.

It was also published on ABC News Breakfast’s Facebook and Twitter, receiving over 14,000 views online and a 93 on the Keep Left Impact Score. Most importantly, this piece of earned media resulted in a jump of 233 hits to the puppy raising page and a 450% increase in puppy raiser inquiries that day.

Keep Left have been working with Guide Dogs Victoria for the past four years to deliver a comprehensive PR strategy for the work it does in helping individuals and families of those who are blind or have low vision.

Find out more about our work with not-for-profits across Australia, including St John Ambulance, Red Nose and Wesley Mission Victoria.